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ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE STIMULUS CHECKS.

Posted on April 3, 2020 at 4:04 PM Comments comments (3)


                   

stimuluschecks

   We are aware that these are unprecedented Times and there are a lot of challenges during these Period. We are encouraging you to rise above this Situation and remain confident, that you will come out Stronger, Bigger and Better off. 
 
   President Trump just signed off a $2 Trillion Relief Bill, which will come in form of Stimulus Checks to offer Assistance to Millions of American Household, affected by the Corona Virus Pandemic. We are aware that most of us have Questions  and we want to enlighten you more about, what in this for us.

   The Following are the Basic Things to know about the Stimulus Checks:

  •  Your Eligibility for the Stimulus Check is based on your 2019 Tax Returns as well as your Adjusted Gross Income. If you are yet to file your 2019 Taxes, the IRS will use the 2018 Taxes to determine your Eligibility. The IRS will only use your 2018 Tax Returns, if you have not filed your 2019 Tax Returns. 


  • You must have a Valid Social Security Number to be eligible for this Check. People with  ITIN Numbers and Tax ID Numbers will not be issued Checks.     


  • The Check Values are based on 3 Plans Income Qualification: 

  1. SINGLE TAX FILERS - The Adjusted Gross Income Qualification is $75,000 or Less. This Category will get a $1,200 Stimulus Check.     
  2. HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD FILERS - The Adjusted Gross Income Qualification is $112,500 or Less. This Category will get a $1,200 Stimulus Check.
  3. MARRIED FILING JOINTLY - The Adjusted Gross Income Qualification is $150,000 or Less. This Category will get a $2,400 Stimulus Check.        

       It is important to note that if the Income Exceeds the threshold, the Amount will be reduced on a Sliding Scale. 


  • For Each Dependent/Child, that is Under the Age of 17 Years and Below, you will get an Additional $500 Check, for each Child. Please Note, that this is as long, as the Child/Dependent was stated in the Tax Returns, at the time of Filing. 


  • If a Parent claims the Dependent/Child as a Dependent and this Child/Dependent files their own Taxes, the Parent will not get the Additional $500 Stimulus Check.       



  • The IRS will send the Payment to the Bank Account Information, that you have on File. 



  • If you did not indicate a Bank Account  nor used a Direct Deposit Method for your Tax Refunds, the IRS will mail the Check to the Address on File. 



  • In the Event, that you have moved from the Address on File, you need to File a Form 8822 with the IRS. This is a Change of Address Form to update your Address with the IRS.



  • The IRS will not withhold your Stimulus Check, if you are owing Taxes, the only clause is, if you are backed up on your Child Support Payment. You may have to call the Agency, in charge to make Payments and settlement, so that you are assured of getting your Full Stimulus Check Payment. 

  • The Earlier you file your Taxes, the Earlier you are assured of getting your Stimulus Check.      



        We are available to help you with all the Questions, that you may have , regarding the Stimulus Check as well as any other Question on the Stimulus Package. We are also available to assist you virtually. Call us on 202-422-4586 to set up an Appointment.

      It is always our Pleasure to Help you. 
  

IRS Increases 401K Contribution Limits by $500 from January 1st 2018.

Posted on November 16, 2017 at 2:40 PM Comments comments (2)
  IRS Increases 401K Contribution limits by $500 from January 1st 2018   What this means for you. 
   The IRS had announced sometime in October, that effective from January 1 2018, the contribution limit for Employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans and the Federal Government’s Thrift Savings Plan will be increased from $18,000 to $18,500.

  This is surely a Big Deal. As we all know, this extra $500 can help us more than we may think and it could also mean up to $70,000 more in your retirement account, assuming you decide a retirement age of 67 for yourself and at a 6 percent annual rate of return.  

 This is also important to know, as we have only few weeks to the end of the Year and most of us have less than 3 Payroll Cycles to the end of 2017. We need to ensure that we are working towards reaching the limit of $18,000 for this Year and if you are over 50, try to ensure that your Payroll Company implements your catch-up contribution limit of $6,000. It’s been discovered that most time, they don’t implement it, unless you inform them.

  If you have not been contributing the maximum amount to your 401(k), this IRS Announcement is a useful reminder to push your contribution rate higher.  Even if you’re not saving that much, increasing your savings rate by a percentage point or two every year, and anytime you get a pay raise will make a Big Difference to you in Retirement.

  In addition to this announcement, the income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the saver’s credit is also increased for 2018.

 Taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA, if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or their spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. If neither the taxpayer nor their spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply.

           Here are the phase-out ranges for 2018:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $63,000 to $73,000, up from $62,000 to $72,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $101,000 to $121,000, up from $99,000 to $119,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $189,000 and $199,000, up from $186,000 and $196,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.
 
           Highlights of Limitations that Remain Unchanged for 2018:

  • The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $5,500. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost- of – living adjustment and remains $1,000.
  •  The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401K, 403(b), most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan remains unchanged at $6,000.

 

Please Note that If you don’t have a 401(k), there are other ways to put your money to work. Consider alternate retirement savings accounts, such as Roth IRA , Traditional IRA and/or Health Savings Account.
 
The IRS issued technical guidance detailing these items in Notice 2017-64