My Blog

Blog

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE STIMULUS CHECKS.

Posted on April 3, 2020 at 4:04 PM Comments comments (3)


                   

stimuluschecks

   We are aware that these are unprecedented Times and there are a lot of challenges during these Period. We are encouraging you to rise above this Situation and remain confident, that you will come out Stronger, Bigger and Better off. 
 
   President Trump just signed off a $2 Trillion Relief Bill, which will come in form of Stimulus Checks to offer Assistance to Millions of American Household, affected by the Corona Virus Pandemic. We are aware that most of us have Questions  and we want to enlighten you more about, what in this for us.

   The Following are the Basic Things to know about the Stimulus Checks:

  •  Your Eligibility for the Stimulus Check is based on your 2019 Tax Returns as well as your Adjusted Gross Income. If you are yet to file your 2019 Taxes, the IRS will use the 2018 Taxes to determine your Eligibility. The IRS will only use your 2018 Tax Returns, if you have not filed your 2019 Tax Returns. 


  • You must have a Valid Social Security Number to be eligible for this Check. People with  ITIN Numbers and Tax ID Numbers will not be issued Checks.     


  • The Check Values are based on 3 Plans Income Qualification: 

  1. SINGLE TAX FILERS - The Adjusted Gross Income Qualification is $75,000 or Less. This Category will get a $1,200 Stimulus Check.     
  2. HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD FILERS - The Adjusted Gross Income Qualification is $112,500 or Less. This Category will get a $1,200 Stimulus Check.
  3. MARRIED FILING JOINTLY - The Adjusted Gross Income Qualification is $150,000 or Less. This Category will get a $2,400 Stimulus Check.        

       It is important to note that if the Income Exceeds the threshold, the Amount will be reduced on a Sliding Scale. 


  • For Each Dependent/Child, that is Under the Age of 17 Years and Below, you will get an Additional $500 Check, for each Child. Please Note, that this is as long, as the Child/Dependent was stated in the Tax Returns, at the time of Filing. 


  • If a Parent claims the Dependent/Child as a Dependent and this Child/Dependent files their own Taxes, the Parent will not get the Additional $500 Stimulus Check.       



  • The IRS will send the Payment to the Bank Account Information, that you have on File. 



  • If you did not indicate a Bank Account  nor used a Direct Deposit Method for your Tax Refunds, the IRS will mail the Check to the Address on File. 



  • In the Event, that you have moved from the Address on File, you need to File a Form 8822 with the IRS. This is a Change of Address Form to update your Address with the IRS.



  • The IRS will not withhold your Stimulus Check, if you are owing Taxes, the only clause is, if you are backed up on your Child Support Payment. You may have to call the Agency, in charge to make Payments and settlement, so that you are assured of getting your Full Stimulus Check Payment. 

  • The Earlier you file your Taxes, the Earlier you are assured of getting your Stimulus Check.      



        We are available to help you with all the Questions, that you may have , regarding the Stimulus Check as well as any other Question on the Stimulus Package. We are also available to assist you virtually. Call us on 202-422-4586 to set up an Appointment.

      It is always our Pleasure to Help you. 
  

IT'S TAX SEASON.

Posted on January 31, 2019 at 3:59 PM Comments comments (1)
    
  IRS Begins Accepting Tax Returns on Monday, January 28th 2019.
  It's Official; Tax Payers should not worry about their Refund Status being affected by any Happenings within the Government.
  It is also important to note that Monday, April 15, 2019 still remains the Individual Filing Deadline for the majority of the Country, though the Deadline in Maine and Massachusetts is April 17 due to the Emancipation Day Holiday.

     Important Points to Note:

  • The First Refunds will go out in the First Week of February and Many Refunds will be paid by Mid- to Late February.
  • The IRS expects about 90 Percent of the Tax Refunds to be filed electronically. Choosing E-File and Direct Deposit remains the fastest and safest way to file an accurate Income Tax Return and Receive a Refund.
  • The Form 1040 has been re-designed for the Tax Year 2018. The Revised Form consolidates Forms 1040, 1040A and 1040- EZ into one Form, that All Individual Tax Payers will use to file their 2018 Federal Income Tax Return.

  We are Here to Help you with Organizing your Documents and Getting all your Business Expenses correctly and accurately deducted. This will help to reduce your Tax Liability.
 
 Keep Checking for Weekly Updates and Important Information, regarding your Tax Filing.

  Let the Tax Season Begin ......................................................
 

RENEW YOUR ITINS.

Posted on August 17, 2018 at 5:36 PM Comments comments (5)






















More than 2 Million Individual Tax Payer Identification Numbers( ITINs) are set to expire at the end of 2018.

* Tax Payers whose ITIN is expiring and needs to file a Tax Return in 2019 must submit a Renewal Application.

* ITINs that are affected are the ones with the middle digits 73,74,75, 76, 77, 81 or 82. ( For Example: 9NN-73-NNNN) needs to be renewed even if the Tax Payer has used it in the last 3 Years. 

*ITINS with middle digits of 70,71,72,78,79 or 80 have previously expired. Tax Payers with these ITINs can still renew at anytime.

* Acting Now to renew ITIN Numbers will help Taxpayers avoid delays, that could affect their Tax Filing and Refunds in 2019.

* As a Reminder, the IRS no longer accepts passports that do not have a Date of Entry into the US as a Stand Alone Identification Document for dependents from a country other than Canada, Mexico or dependents of US Military Personnel Overseas.

* The Dependents passports must have a Date of Entry Stamp, otherwise Additional Documents to prove US Residency will be required.


Read on and Be Enlightened. Feel Free to Share.

TAX DAY IS APRIL 17 2018.

Posted on April 16, 2018 at 9:27 PM Comments comments (2)
The deadline for filing your taxes is fast approaching — this year, The deadline is April 17, 2018.

We all know, that Life can be busy!!! Maybe your taxes are particularly complicated this year, or maybe you just don’t have the time to sit down and sift through the paperwork.

So, what happens if you don’t file your tax return on time?
If you’re getting a refund on your taxes this year, you don’t need to panic — you have until April 17, 2021 to claim your refund (or until October 17, 2021 if you filed an extension by the April 17 deadline). It’s best to file as soon as possible, however, because if you don’t file within that 3-year period, you’ll lose the refund.

If you owe taxes, things get complicated.
First, you’ll be charged a failure-to-file penalty. That penalty is 5 percent of your unpaid tax bill for every month after the April deadline that you fail to pay. The amount can grow to a maximum of 25 percent of your total unpaid bill.
In addition, you will be charged interest on whatever amount you did not pay. The interest rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percent with interest compounded daily. That can add up very quickly.

How to File for an Extension on your Taxes.
If you think you might be unable to file your tax return by the April 17 deadline, the best way to avoid fees and penalties is to file for an automatic six-month extension with the IRS using Form 4868. It’s free and pretty easy.
But if you owe taxes, you’ll still need to pay them by the April 17 deadline or penalties, fees and interest will start to accrue. 
Form 4868 does not grant the taxpayer an extension of time to pay their tax.
If you owe the IRS money and are having trouble coming up with the money, you have a few options. You can file for an extension of time to pay your tax bill using Form 1127: Application for Extension of Time for Payment of Tax Due to Undue Hardship, but be aware that the laws are very strict about granting such extensions.

* The IRS must receive Form 1127 on or before the date that the tax is due.

* The taxpayer must include a complete statement of all their assets and liabilities at the end of the previous month, as well as an itemized list of money they received and spent the previous three months prior to submitting the extension request.

* The taxpayer must show that the payment of tax would result in “undue hardship.” That means more than inconvenience.

*The taxpayer must show that paying by the due date would result in a serious loss of money and that they don’t have the funds, nor can they raise them through borrowing.

When granted, these extensions usually last 6 months. For more information about extensions to pay tax, visit the IRS website at www.irs.gov.

(You can read more about payment plans and other options for what to do if you can’t pay your tax bill here.)
Ultimately, it is the best and safest idea to file your return by the April 17 deadline or file for an extension. That may be a hassle now, but it could save you a significant amount of financial harm in the future. If you need assistance, please call us as soon as possible.